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➵ The Indian in the Cupboard Download ➾ Author Lynne Reid Banks – Clinback.co

I am not too sure why I chose to read The Indian in the Cupboard by Lynne Reid Banks other than it came with a pile of other books recently donated to me by a colleague Whilst it is a book I was aware of perhaps from the film adaptation it wasn t one that had got anywhere near my to read list Neither did I realise that The Indian in the Cupboard was written by the same author who produced The L Shaped Room a comparatively ground breaking novel of 1960 The L Shaped Room was also adapted for the cinema and highlighted the stigma of being an unmarried mother at that time perhaps I should have read that book instead Clearly The Indian in the Cupboard is quite a different prospect and written 20 years after The L Shaped Room this is another story in which toys come to life , only this time the story considers the reality of such a situation.Apparently The Indian in the Cupboard was somewhat of a success and a minor phenomenon following its publication whilst at the same time attracting almost instantaneous and significant criticism On the one hand the novel is a pretty straightforward story of the magic of toys coming to life and the special time that is childhood on the other though it is at least to some extent a perpetuation of offensive racial stereotyping the Indian in itself an outdated incorrect term Little Bull and Indians collectively being referred to as primitive, savage, cruel and uncivilized , seemingly taking great delight in collecting scalps, with fierce black eyes and always apparently quick to act with violence, almost throughout Conversely, it could be argued or rationalised on the basis that The Indian in the Cupboard attempts at least in part to undermine racial stereotyping and misconceptions in that it does at least debunk some myths and provides an explanation of how the taking of scalps for instance came about i.e a practice propagated instigated by white settlers in exchange for guns, whisky, money In addition, Little Bull is depicted also as being creative and an accomplished builder So on the one hand, what we have is actually quite a good story of a boy, his friend, the magic of toys and childhood culminating in a somewhat poignant, if a little predictable ending on the other an undeniably racist portrayal of a Native American Indian Iroquois, which is where the book ultimately falls down On balance what needs to be considered here is the The Indian in the Cupboard is a product of the 1980 s and not perhaps the 1930 s, where such racial stereotyping whilst not excusable could have been viewed at least as a product of its time ultimately a shame The Indian in the Cupboard feels as though it is vainly striving to do the right thing and portray Little Bull as a positive and accomplished character in a fun yet acceptable manner unfortunately for the author, it fails in this endeavour Little Bull is nothing than a stereotypical caricature determined entirely by his ethnicity and culture Yes, this is a children s book, but that doesn t mean it has to be based on stereotypes the influence of children s books on their readers cannot and should not ever be underestimated. Omri is a young boy who receives a cupboard from his best friend Patrick When he uses his Grandmother s old key with a red satin ribbon in the cupboard with his Indian, something magical begins to happen in the cupboard His Indian magically comes to life Can Omri handle the magic of bringing his toys to life Read on and find out for yourself.This was a pretty good read I had seen the film when I was younger but didn t know it was based on a book so when I borrowed it from my church s library, I decided to read it for myself If you like stories about magic, toys coming to life, and then definitely check this book out for yourself This book is available at your local library and wherever books are sold. At First, Omri Is Unimpressed With The Plastic Indian Toy He Is Given For His Birthday But When He Puts It In His Old Cupboard And Turns The Key, Something Extraordinary Happens That Will Change Omri S Life For Ever For Little Bear, The Iroquois Indian Brave, Comes To Life Okay so this is so cute and full of imagination Wouldn t you as a kid in Elementary school love to have a magical cupboard that brought all your plas stikk toys to life Omri thought the same thing until so much trouble and lies got into his conscience The bossy Indian, the crybaby cowboy, a demanding friend, a loose rat in the house So much fun to read Felt like a kid all over again I think this would be a good book for kids who hate reading. Found this book under my sisters bed because she s a hoarder and shit so I was so freaking happy to read this book I remember the movie because I also own that shit too but for some reason I have NEVER read this book I really need to sit down and reconsider life changes so that I actually read a book before it becomes a movie MAYBE ONE DAY GUYS The Indian in the Cupboard brought back so many childhood memories I loved this movie I thought it was the shit So diving into the book was just amazing to me I really wanted to see if I would love it , if not equally.Okay, kind of cool yet creepy to visualize toys coming to life Now these toys sound awesome not that creepy doll that murders people Dolls scare the shit out of me those moving eyes and shit BUT these toys and like the toy story movies I could totally handle them alive I d freak out but then enjoy the hell out of it.Now before I wrote this review I definitely saw people claiming there was racism in this book I didn t see it that way at all I loved Little Bull and I enjoyed his broken English English is hard enough as it is for someone who doesn t speak it as a first language Just like when you learn spanish, french, german, or whatever language you want to learn it s hard as fuck and people are probably judging you for speaking weird or wrong when it comes first nature to them Little Bull and the cowboy are just like I remember I wish I could remember the cowboy s name right now but I honestly can t Yes, the cowboy does use some racial slurs but I assumed it was out of fear If people don t know about something they usually assume the worst of it.Besides the little characters, I really enjoyed Omri This book made me so happy to see all of these characters and read the story line all over again It definitely makes me want to re watch the movie just for fun Overall, really enjoyed diving back into a childhood favorite I m mad that it took me so freaking long to read this book I will probably reread it over and over again I read this as a kid and I just re read it last week b c I m teaching it to my 4th graders I love it for the vocabulary wielded, lithely, haughtily that I get to expose them to I love it for the well defined characters Yesterday my students wrote from the perspective of Little Bear and they loved it Me cold Who this big man What want And I love it for the fantastical story Great book for kids and fun to read again as an adult. Golly, I must have read this book a hundred times There was just something so magical, so appealing about it I hope kids today are still reading, I think it s timeless.Reread 2018 Really interesting to read this aloud as an adult, and aloud to my kids I was worried that it would be racist, and sort of But mostly in the way the Little Bear talks He s new to speaking English, so it s a little short and abrupt, and I think she took it too far, but not to the point where he was a grunting savage I was actually impressed with how much is debunked in this, like Little Bear not having seen a teepee before he s Iroquois and the fact that blood brothers is a white construct to make the Natives behave It was interesting to see, and what my kids picked up on as well, was that Little Bear was kind of a spoiled brat, who had a lot of change come over him being in a situation where he wasn t the proud chief s son Omri changed, and so did his friend Patrick, as they became empathetic toward these real people who depended on them So, to sum up It still works Also, it s on the 2018 2019 Battle of the Books curriculum. What a racist, dull, unimaginative book Full of stereotypes and negative images, this book should be taught only to teach young people how NOT to write books I only read this book for a grad class and would never recommend it to anyone First, the writing is cliched and boring Secondly, the way Lynne Reid Banks has portrayed the Indian apparently, Little Bear is Iroquois is racist and offensive Little Bear only speaks in grunts and incomplete sentences, and the cowboy Boone wants only to kill the dirty, smelly Injun Omri, the little boy who is given Little Bear as a present one he doesn t want again, this is a terrible book , refuses at first to gather the materials for Little Bear to make a longhouse which is traditionally the lodging of an Iroquois, not a tepee This is only one example of how Banks has made her book a metaphor for how ignorant white people have subjugated and marginalized the Indian populations of America by refusing to understand, listen to, or accommodate Indian heritage No one should willingly pick up this book. This book, oh man This was the book I used to read and re read and re re read as a kid That book that the cliche reader goes through so many times that he wears out the cheap mass market paperback and has to beg his parents to buy him another copy from the Scholastic book order forms from school membah dem.Now I get to share it with my daughter, and rediscover how grand an adventure it truly is OH And anyone who hasn t read it, and is scanning down through the reviews to see if it is right for you and or your children, let me say this any of the reviewers complaining about racism don t understand the context of racism The Indian speaks like a stereotypical Indian That s because English is a second, or likely a fourth or fifth, language for him His dialog is in a stereotypical Indian voice because that s how YOU are reading it Little Bull simply doesn t speak English all that well He s speaking the way anyone would speak broken English, be it a Mexican or Swede or Iroquois or Martian English is a hard language, man Back off.There are a few racial slurs from a cowboy character, and a few casual drops of the term Red Indian But those are kind of the point This story shows Little Bull as brave, shrewd, caring, and most of all human It shows the reader as it showed me when I was young that the slurs are from stupidity or fear It helped me see these words should not define the people they re directed at, but rather the people they issue from Wow, went off on a tangent, there, huh Sorry Bottom line this is a beautiful story, full of magic and acceptance and wonder. I ve heard a lot of negativity regarding this book, especially that it is notoriously racist However, although it does feature a few dated stereotypes, I don t know if I would really call it racist In fact, the book is not only an entertaining fantasy story, but it also teaches younger readers about looking past the stereotypes in toys, books and the media and learning the true history and cultural diversity of humanity Omri and Little Bear become close friends in the novel, also showing readers the value of companionship, and Omri also deals with sibling bickering, coming of age and learns from Little Bear how to be resourceful and respectful Written in powerful prose without a lot of unnecessary filler, The Indian in the Cupboard might be a little out of date but it is still a book that readers of all ages can enjoy There s also a great 1990 s film that has adapted from the story.