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Flatland A Romance of Many Dimensions MOBI ò Flatland

This masterpiece of science and mathematical fiction is a delightfully unique and highly entertaining satire that has charmed readers for than 100 years The work of English clergyman educator and Shakespearean scholar Edwin A Abbott 1838 1926 it describes the journeys of A Square sic – ed a mathematician and resident of the two dimensional Flatland where women thin straight lines are the lowliest of shapes and where men may have any number of sides depending on their social statusThrough strange occurrences that bring him into contact with a host of geometric forms Square has adventures in Spaceland three dimensions Lineland one dimension and Pointland no dimensions and ultimately entertains thoughts of visiting a land of four dimensions—a revolutionary idea for which he is returned to his two dimensional world Charmingly illustrated by the author Flatland is not only fascinating reading it is still a first rate fictional introduction to the concept of the multiple dimensions of space Instructive entertaining and stimulating to the imagination — Mathematics Teacher


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    When you read this book keep two things in mind First it was written back in 1880 when relativity had not yet been invented when quantum theory was not yet discovered when only a handful of mathematicians had the courage yet to challenge Euclid and imagine curved space geometries and geometries with infinite dimensionality As such it is an absolutely brilliant work of speculative mathematics deftly hidden in a peculiar but strangely amusing social satireSecond its point even about itself is still as apropos today as it was then We still do not really know what the true dimensionality of the Universe is It seems somehow unlikely that it is just four even in terms of spacetime dimensions String theory talks seriously about thousands of dimensions Quantum theory implements very seriously infinite numbers of dimensions And yet we are still stuck in our 3 space dimensions mentally hardly able to visualize the 4 in which we live properly unless we study theoretical physics for a decade or three and utterly unable to mentally imagine those four embedded in a veritable Hilbert's Grand Hotel of dimensionsUltimately this is a book about keeping an open mind A really open mind avoiding the trap of scientific materialism and the trap of theistic idealism and the trap of any other favorite ism you might come up with Our entire visible space time continuum could be nothing than a single thin page in an infinitely thick book of similar pages that book one of an infinite number of similar books on an infinite shelf that shelf but one such shelf in an infinite bookcase of shelves that bookcase but one in an infinite library of bookcases that library but one but by now you get the ideaWe have a hard time opening our minds up to the enormous range of possibilities preferring to live our lives mentally trapped in a single tiny period on just one of those pages in pointland We may be quite unable to actually perceive the space in which our tiny point is embedded but our minds are capable of conceiving it and Abbot's lovely parable is a mind expanding work to those who choose to read it that wayrgb